The Truth About Riding A Motorcycle

7:03:00 AM

The truth about riding a motorcycle 

Are you on the verge of your next great adventure? Are you about to set off traveling around the world (or the state, perhaps)? If so, how are you going to do it? If you’re going to another country, a plane might be a good option, but if you’re staying closer to home, then why not step away from the car and use a motorcycle for your next exciting road trip? It’s different for one thing, you’ll feel a lot freer, and you might discover something about yourself along the way. 

Of course, you can’t just hop on a motorcycle and drive off into the sunset hoping for the best. There are rules to learn, a license to obtain, and practice to experience before you can do that. There are also a number of essential truths to discover; read on to find out more.

Photo by Jan Karan from Pexels

1. Helmets do more harm than good

Of course, this idea is not in the least bit accurate. Most nations have regulations requiring motorcyclists (and their passengers) to wear helmets or other head protection. There are certain exceptions, but in general, you must wear a helmet

One myth or misunderstanding regarding helmets is that they do more harm than good, specifically that they increase your chances of breaking your neck in an accident because the extra weight of the helmet causes your head to move about. The truth is that most studies and data show that motorcyclists who wear helmets have a substantially reduced risk of neck injury than those who do not wear helmets, and their heads in general are obviously kept safer too.

2. Helmets mean you can't see or hear

Another frequent misconception about helmets and motorcycle riders is that they impair your capacity to see or hear danger. This is not true nor backed by statistics. Wearing a helmet has the reverse effect: the visor protects the rider’s eyes from wind and debris, enabling them to see better. It also reduces wind noise, allowing the rider to hear better. 

Helmets can also decrease tiredness by reducing noise and wind pressure on the head. The use of a helmet does not enhance the likelihood of an accident. It does, however, decrease the risk of severe harm in the event of a collision.

3. Loud pipes can make riding safer

On the surface, this popular misconception seems to be correct. According to the explanation, the louder the exhaust pipes on your bike are, the more attention and awareness a rider will attract to themselves, making them safer, and less likely to need exceptional motorcycle accident attorneys

However, according to Motorcycle Cruiser Magazine, “riders with loud pipes crash more often than those with stock pipes.” This fact is supported by physics: the exhaust pipes are located on the rear of a motorcycle, and this is where the noise is focused. Cars in front of the motorbike may not be able to hear them at all. And if a motorcycle is crossing a junction, they are riding ahead of the traffic. According to studies, having vivid or bright colors on your helmet, gear, and clothes makes you more successful at staying safe.

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